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Michael's Metaphors of Life Journal

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Pandemic Inertia: Cutting Loose the Anchor

September 24th, 2022 by Michael Dyet
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Hmmm, can we free ourselves from the dead weight of inertia?

It seems like a lifetime ago that the COVID19 pandemic was officially declared and the world as we knew it shifted off its axis. I recall the Friday morning at work when we were told to take our laptops home for the weekend just in case. By the end of the weekend, just in case had become until further notice.

Initially, we all thought until further notice meant at most a few months. Then it became six months, then a year and then… you know the rest of that story. We were shut down, turned around and locked down.

Flash forward to today and work from home has become a permanent state for many of us. I am quite happy with that arrangement. But I have come to realize that it is part of a bigger, seismic shift that has some not so nice repercussions.

For extended periods of time over the 2+ year period we were told to stay put (at home), stay apart (six feet) and stay away (from work). By and large, we did. What we did not foresee was that Isaac Newton’s First Law of Motion would take on a whole new dimension.

Newton’s First Law states: A body at rest will remain at rest, and a body in motion will remain in motion unless it is acted upon by an external force. In layman’s terms, this simply means that things cannot start, stop or change direction by themselves. It requires a force acting on them from outside to cause such a change.

We stopped moving, lost our day to day momentum and quite literally got stuck. I will confess that it happened to me. I adapted to being at home most of the time. It became an adjustment, then a habit and now an engrained state of being.

I am naming the phenomenon Pandemic Inertia. We stopped moving, because we were ordered to do so, and while we were not paying attention inertia set in. Inertia is a tough state to break. It feels like we are dragging a hundred pound anchor around which discourages us from moving.

A consequence of this inertia is that we have been drawn deeper into the virtual world. We connect via our laptop screen or digital device. The ability to connect virtually certainly has its advantages. But as a steady diet it really is not enough. There is no substitute for face to face.

The impetus is now on us, each of us personally, to get ourselves moving again. Those who make their living from creating ever more immersive forms of virtual reality would rather that we did not do so. They have a vested interest in keeping us stuck. But we have a vested interest in getting moving again. Our physical and mental health depends upon it.

So my ask of each of you is to fight back against pandemic inertia and reclaim the life you knew before the lockdowns. Cut loose the anchor that got tied to you.

In Newtonian terms, we have to be the force that starts each other moving again. We were meant to be in motion and it is time we started acting that way again.

~ Now Available Online from Amazon, Chapters Indigo or Barnes & Noble: Hunting Muskie, Rites of Passage – Stories by Michael Robert Dyet

~ Michael Robert Dyet is also the author of Until the Deep Water Stills – An Internet-enhanced Novel which was a double winner in the Reader Views Literary Awards 2009. Visit Michael’s website at www.mdyetmetaphor.com or the novel online companion at www.mdyetmetaphor.com/blog.

~ Subscribe to Michael’s Metaphors of Life Journal aka That Make Me Go Hmmm at its’ internet home www.mdyetmetaphor.com/blog2. Instructions for subscribing are provided in the Subscribe to this Blog: How To instructions page in the right sidebar. If you’re reading this post on another social networking site, come back regularly to my page for postings once a week.

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Retrospective: The Butterfly Effect

September 10th, 2022 by Michael Dyet
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Hmmm, can I initiate a ripple of good will that sends hope on the wing far and wide?

I usually wait until winter sets in before I do my first retrospective of the winged wonders that I crossed paths with in my summer hikes. But my posts have been rather gloomy lately as I dig around in the messy issues that are dominating our society. So in the interest of lightening the mood, I am turning over this post to the butterflies of summer.

This striking butterfly is a Giant Swallowtail – so named because of its large size. With a wingspan of about five inches, it is the biggest butterfly that graces our fields and meadows and typically arrives in mid to late summer as it expands north across the Great Lakes. It flies with a graceful series of strong flaps and short glides.

Silver-spotted Skippers like the one above are early birds. They start appearing in early June if the weather is warm enough. Named for the large silver spot in the wings, they are quite common, very photogenic and quite cooperative. This lovely specimen perched perfectly on a broad flat leaf to be photographed.

Red Admirals are quite common in these parts but always command attention with their splash of red, orange, black and chocolate brown. They are hyperactive active dashing about frantically and erratically as if in a mad rush to get somewhere. Red Admirals are a pugnacious species that darts out at anything crossing their territory including humans.

No butterfly retrospective would be complete without the Great Spangled Fritillary. It is the most eye-catching butterfly in our area with its bright golden upper wing with black markings and the gaudy silver spots on the underwing. It is also among the larger butterflies here with a wingspan of about three inches and lights up any meadow it frequents.

This year was in fact a relatively poor one for butterflies in terms of numbers. It may have been the drought conditions that prevailed which made them scarce. But although they were fewer in number, they still were an infusion of beauty and grace.

The butterfly effect metaphor denotes that small things can have a big effect – i.e. a butterfly flapping its wings causes a chain reaction which results in a major change somewhere in the world. So if this retrospective of winged wonders lifts your spirit, let us hope the ripple effect crosses the planet and spreads good will and hope at a time when it is very much needed.

~ Now Available Online from Amazon, Chapters Indigo or Barnes & Noble: Hunting Muskie, Rites of Passage – Stories by Michael Robert Dyet

~ Michael Robert Dyet is also the author of Until the Deep Water Stills – An Internet-enhanced Novel which was a double winner in the Reader Views Literary Awards 2009. Visit Michael’s website at www.mdyetmetaphor.com .

~ Subscribe to Michael’s Metaphors of Life Journal aka That Make Me Go Hmmm at its’ internet home www.mdyetmetaphor.com/blog2. Instructions for subscribing are provided in the Subscribe to this Blog: How To instructions page in the right sidebar. If you’re reading this post on another social networking site, come back regularly to my page for postings once a week

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The Zero Sum Game

September 3rd, 2022 by Michael Dyet
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Hmmm, can we summon the will to correct our course while time is still on our side?

The calendar has rolled over to September and summer is unofficially winding down on this holiday weekend. Technically the last day of summer is September 22. But for most of us the Labour Day weekend is the threshold.

September always has the feel of a restart given that the new school year begins. My last day of university was 40 long years ago. But the restart state of mind still prevails. This year’s restart has more of a feel or normalcy to it with most of the pandemic protocols removed – although two Ontario universities are stubbornly still imposing the face mask mandate on their students.

The Monarch Butterfly, as seen at the top of this post, is as enduring  a symbol for fall as we are likely to find. Monarchs are staging now for their epic 2,000 + mile migration to their wintering grounds on a mountaintop in Mexico. Their departure this year is more poignant as they have were recently designated an endangered species.

Giving the state of the world these days, I wish that I could tag along with the Monarch migration. Hanging out on a balmy Mexico plateau for the winter is very enticing. But if I did so, I might not have the motivation to make the return trip and re-enter the fracas.

Butterflies, of course, are a metaphor for metamorphosis (pardon the alliteration). Moving through the pupae stage to the caterpillar stage and finally to adult stage, they epitomize the need to evolve over time. Life does not allow us to stand still. We must continuously adapt to the changing world around us. But it is becoming increasingly difficult to do so.

How do we adapt to a world that is increasingly fractured and at odds? The concept of living in harmony is a preferred state that is nearly impossible to achieve now. Increasingly, humankind, by some malicious force, is forming battle lines on numerous fronts.

The principle of living in harmony is being supplanted by the principle of discord. Pick one side or the other, we are told, and act accordingly. If I am not on your side, I am your enemy. If I adopt a neutral stance, I become the enemy of both sides.

In this scenario, there must always be winners and losers. Winners take the spoils and use them to consolidate their position. Losers slink away to lick their wounds and regroup for another assault.

I am of the belief that the principle of discord, and the dynamics that feed it, is a zero sum game. There is no state of peace or rest in the equation. There is only the state of hyper readiness for the next assault.

I hope we do not see the extinction of the Monarch butterflies. If we do, it could be a harbinger of our own approaching extinction as a species that lost its way in the universal changing of the seasons. There is still time to correct our course. But it requires relinquishing and banning the I Win – You Lose mentality.

~ Now Available Online from Amazon, Chapters Indigo or Barnes & Noble: Hunting Muskie, Rites of Passage – Stories by Michael Robert Dyet

~ Michael Robert Dyet is also the author of Until the Deep Water Stills – An Internet-enhanced Novel which was a double winner in the Reader Views Literary Awards 2009. Visit Michael’s website at www.mdyetmetaphor.com .

~ Subscribe to Michael’s Metaphors of Life Journal aka That Make Me Go Hmmm at its’ internet home www.mdyetmetaphor.com/blog2. Instructions for subscribing are provided in the Subscribe to this Blog: How To instructions page in the right sidebar. If you’re reading this post on another social networking site, come back regularly to my page for postings once a week

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The Runaway Grocery Cart Armageddon

August 27th, 2022 by Michael Dyet
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Hmmm, if we all pitch in, can we stave off Armageddon?

I went grocery shopping on Thursday afternoon as usual. I had the grocery cart filled with bags and was wheeling it through the parking lot to my car while momentarily distracted thinking about a side trip I planned to make on the way home.

A gust of wind swept up the grocery receipt, which I had tucked into one of the bags, and sent it skittering across the ground. Instinctively, I let go of the cart and started chasing the receipt. The wind kept blowing it just out of my reach. I finally managed to stamp my foot down on it so I could retrieve it.

As I did so, I heard the sound of the grocery cart rolling away. I quickly turned and realized that the parking lot slopes away from the store. Shit! Shit! Shit!, I muttered under my breath as I pictured several disastrous scenarios:

The grocery cart angling right and slamming into a car putting a sizable dent in it – in which case I would be liable for the cost.

The grocery cart angling left and running down the little old lady causing her to do a spectacular backflip before crashing to the pavement – in which case I would be calling 911 and explaining my moment of distraction to the police officer.

The grocery cart plunging straight ahead achieving terminal velocity as it reached the end of the parking lot and vaulting the curb into the street causing a multi-vehicle collision – in which case, see above.

Fortunately, I managed to chase down the cart (much to the displeasure of my temperamental back which forbids me to run) and corral it before any of these disastrous outcomes unfolded. The only damage was to my back which was in a bad mood for the rest of the day.

It occurred to me that the runaway grocery cart was a living metaphor for the state of the world today. On any given day, there are several ticking time bombs at home and around the globe that could quickly escalate with catastrophic results. Plenty of content for the 6:00 news which thrives on these events.

We elect politicians to prevent such things from happening or to wrestle them under control if they do. But the politicians insist on devoting their efforts to pretending the problem does not exist or will resolve itself, finding someone else to blame when the shit hits the fan or preparing their pre-emptive I told you so statements for the media.

So what can do? Perhaps each of us can commit to chasing down one of the runaway grocery carts that are gathering speed and merging course. None of us can solve all the problems. But all of us can help solve one problem and together staff off Armageddon.

Now Available Online from Amazon, Chapters Indigo or Barnes & Noble: Hunting Muskie, Rites of Passage – Stories by Michael Robert Dyet

~ Michael Robert Dyet is also the author of Until the Deep Water Stills – An Internet-enhanced Novel which was a double winner in the Reader Views Literary Awards 2009. Visit Michael’s website at www.mdyetmetaphor.com .

~ Subscribe to Michael’s Metaphors of Life Journal aka Things That Make Me Go Hmmm at its’ internet home www.mdyetmetaphor.com/blog2. Instructions for subscribing are provided in the Subscribe to this Blog: How To instructions page in the right sidebar. If you’re reading this post on another social networking site, come back regularly to my page for postings once a week.

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On Demand, In Demand and Out of Hand

August 20th, 2022 by Michael Dyet
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Hmmm, is it time to take a literal leap of faith to reclaim the quality of life we value?

If you follow my posts regularly, you know that relentless change and the accelerating pace of life is a theme I return to regularly. Hang on tight: I am headed down that road again.

Technology is a primary (although not exclusive) driver in this struggle. The cycle of new generations of technology is constantly shrinking. We barely get up to speed on the newest iteration when the next one arrives. I strongly suspect that the developers have the next two generations already on the drawing board when the latest version is released.

Other factors are now entering into the equation and further accelerating the pace of life. High on the list these days is the pandemic we are just emerging from – or more specifically, the way life was forcibly paused for two years by lockdowns and other restrictions.

Companies are desperately trying to make up for last time and lost revenue. With an economic recession on the horizon, they are shifting into overdrive to maximize returns before the window of opportunity closes again. Staff are often running flat out to keep up with what is required of them – the more so as labour shortages leave some positions unfilled.

The same thing is happening on the personal level as people, starved for two years for entertainment and genuine enjoyment, are trying to grab all they can surrendering to the “who knows what tomorrow may bring” school of thought.

Being an observer and student of these trends, I perceive that they are pushing us every deeper into the on demand world. We have been headed in that direction for some time as the corporate world transitions to a just-in-time delivery model – skipping the warehouse shelves and instead going direct from the assembly line to the consumer.

The on demand movement in turn is feeding an in demand state of affairs. If you have the skills that match the requirements of potential employers, you are very much in demand and can choose where you want to work. But being in demand can be a mixed blessing. You are only as good as your last week’s productivity and have no room for error if you fall off the pace.

When we enter all these factors into the life equation – technology wheels spinning ever faster, sprinting to get caught up, racing to keep up, competing with others to hold onto your privileged position as the in demand person – things can begin to unravel.

The old metaphor of the treadmill does not cut it anymore. The path we are now on is equivalent to those moving walkways that some airports feature. But the walkway is moving in the opposite direction we need to go. We have to run twice as fast as the walkway is moving in order to move ahead. The walkway speeds up each day so we too have to keep speeding up.

Life was not meant to be a daily sprint to the wire that renews itself every morning. We are not created to be always in go-mode. The rigours of being in demand in the on demand world is getting out of hand.

If the walkway will not stop speeding up, we may have to take a literal leap of faith to jump off and reclaim the life we value.

~ Now Available Online from Amazon, Chapters Indigo or Barnes & Noble: Hunting Muskie, Rites of Passage – Stories by Michael Robert Dyet

~ Michael Robert Dyet is also the author of Until the Deep Water Stills – An Internet-enhanced Novel which was a double winner in the Reader Views Literary Awards 2009. Visit Michael’s website at www.mdyetmetaphor.com .

~ Subscribe to Michael’s Metaphors of Life Journal aka That Make Me Go Hmmm at its’ internet home www.mdyetmetaphor.com/blog2. Instructions for subscribing are provided in the Subscribe to this Blog: How To instructions page in the right sidebar. If you’re reading this post on another social networking site, come back regularly to my page for postings once a week.

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The Butterfly and the Thistle: A Lesson for Us All

August 6th, 2022 by Michael Dyet
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Hmmm, does it always have to be an I win, You Lose confrontation?

I feel I should be considering how I, in my own small way, can contribute to the resolution of the many troubling stories unfolding in the world today:

The immoral Russian invasion of Ukraine, the Russian’s Promises are made to be broken attitude and the hands-tied approach to the matter among the other major world powers.

The critical shortage of frontline staff that is shutting down hospital emergency rooms, the It’s their fault, Not mine political rhetoric around it and the wheel-spinning that characterizes the efforts to address it.

The declared sixth, or is it seventh, wave of the pandemic. I cannot remember what the number is and I am not sure it matters anyway. And oh no, here comes Monkey Pox.

The shocking Hockey Canada scandal and the Circle the wagons mentality which that body is taking instead of addressing the rotting core of the old boy network at its heart.

Professional athletes earning annual salaries of $5 million, $10 million and more while growing numbers of people cannot keep a roof over their heads.

China firing missiles toward Taiwan in an Oh not you don’t response to the visit from U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the age old End justifies the means argument.

Another summer of extreme weather and environmental events – wildfires, floods, drought, tornadoes, earthquakes – that make it increasingly clear that we waited too long to get serious about the impact of climate change.

The apparent normalization of mass shootings wherein the number of deaths now has to reach a certain figure before it is considered to be newsworthy.

Pointing out the Deflect rather than take responsibility nature of the responses from those in positons of power, and the need to hold them accountable for their failure to act, seems like the most I can do which hardly seems like enough.

But I can take the initiative to inject some beauty into the world and, in the process, provide a visual metaphor for the forces that are at war.

The photograph at the head of this post accomplishes that rather effectively. The striking beauty of a Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly perched on a thistle with its thorny stem. There has to be a way for us to coexist without defaulting to the I win, You Lose mentality. The butterfly and the thistle can do it, so surely we can too.

~ Now Available Online from Amazon, Chapters Indigo or Barnes & Noble: Hunting Muskie, Rites of Passage – Stories by Michael Robert Dyet

~ Michael Robert Dyet is also the author of Until the Deep Water Stills – An Internet-enhanced Novel which was a double winner in the Reader Views Literary Awards 2009. Visit Michael’s website at www.mdyetmetaphor.com .

~ Subscribe to Michael’s Metaphors of Life Journal aka That Make Me Go Hmmm at its’ internet home www.mdyetmetaphor.com/blog2. Instructions for subscribing are provided in the Subscribe to this Blog: How To instructions page in the right sidebar. If you’re reading this post on another social networking site, come back regularly to my page for postings once a week.

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Confessions of a Hole-in-My-Shoe Dinosaur

July 30th, 2022 by Michael Dyet
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Hmmm, when everything old is new again, will I have the last laugh?

It is said that confession is good for the soul. In the spirit of that sentiment, there are a few things I need to come clean about.

I never posted a photo on Facebook of the meal I am about to consume. In fact, I have never taken a photo of my meal for any purpose in a restaurant or at home.

I am still using an old Apple iPhone which I purchased so long ago I cannot remember when it was. It is so old that the web browser on it, which I never use, is Safari. I  also never downloaded the update that it notified me of shortly after I bought the phone.

My car is thirteen years old with well over 200,000 kilometres on it. I have to use an actual key to start it as the push button start function was not invented back then. I do not plan to replace it until something serious goes wrong with it. And yes, for shame, it runs on gasoline.

I still read books in print format. I did purchase a Kindle Reader some years ago out of curiosity. I never much cared for it. When it wore out, I went back to print books and will be sticking with them forever.

I have never watched Game of Thrones. Not one episode. I do not even know what it is about or whether it is still on the air. I also do not watch reality TV shows despite the growing reality that there are more of those shows than any other form of programming.

I do not read documents of any length on line. I print them in their entirety so I can read them. If the document is not in a printable format, I will painstakingly copy and paste it into a WORD document so I can print it.

I have clothes in my closet that are more than ten years old. I still wear them regularly and intend to keep doing so. I do not know how many years out of date they are from a fashion perspective. Some of them may have come back in style and gone out of style again. I may still be wearing them when their fashion cycle repeats yet again.

I have never used Uber. Not once. On the infrequent occasions when my thirteen year old car is out of commission, I call a taxi. Yes, taxis still exist.

I have never downloaded an app. Not once. Remarkable as it may seem, my life has not been diminished in any way by this omission.

One of my running shoes, which are several yeas old, has had a hole in the toe for a couple of years. I feel no need to replace it at the present time. A hole in the toe is a minor matter to me as long as the integrity of the rest of the shoe is intact.

In light of the above admissions, I confess that I am a hole-in-my-shoe dinosaur living in an earlier, simpler time. I use things until they wear out, decline to buy things that everybody else has and feel no pressure to watch things that everybody else does.

You may argue that I do not know what I am missing. I will counter, if I do not know what I am missing, how can I miss it? I may have the last laugh when everything old is new again.

Now Available Online from Amazon, Chapters Indigo or Barnes & Noble: Hunting Muskie, Rites of Passage – Stories by Michael Robert Dyet

~ Michael Robert Dyet is also the author of Until the Deep Water Stills – An Internet-enhanced Novel which was a double winner in the Reader Views Literary Awards 2009. Visit Michael’s website at www.mdyetmetaphor.com .

~ Subscribe to Michael’s Metaphors of Life Journal aka That Make Me Go Hmmm at its’ internet home www.mdyetmetaphor.com/blog2. Instructions for subscribing are provided in the Subscribe to this Blog: How To instructions page in the right sidebar. If you’re reading this post on another social networking site, come back regularly to my page for postings once a week.

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The Numbers Apocalypse

July 23rd, 2022 by Michael Dyet
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Hmmm, where will we hide when numbers take over the world?

I have never really been a numbers person. I reached the end of my mathematical abilities in the last year of high school. Two math courses were too much. I dumped Calculus and struggled to the year-end with Relations.

There are people who thrive in this arena – Accountants, Book Keepers, Financial Advisors and related professionals – and make a very good living at it. I pay for their services to keep my brain from overheating and crashing in the attempt to navigate the mysterious equations.

I am finding that my existence is increasing defined by and dependent on numbers. Every company or organization I belong to or do business with assigns me an account number. There seem to be ever more digits in those account numbers which I fear is a conspiracy to muddy my identity and merge me into the untold masses of nameless persons.

My wallet is stuffed full of numbers. My bank card number. My VISA number. My Air Miles number. My Health Card number without which I cannot access health care. My driver’s license number. My Outdoors Card number. My social insurance number which seems to be wedded to me for life. And on and on, with apologies to Buzz Lightyear, to infinity and beyond,

Then there are the dozens upon dozens of passwords I have to maintain for online purposes. Yes, these passwords have letters and symbols in them. But I am convinced that it is the numbers who are calling the shots. They kick around the letters and symbols with malice and consider them superfluous.

And now there are security codes which are becoming ubiquitous. Every time I log on to my work laptop, and often when I need to access an online account, a security code magically appears on my mobile phone. No amount of cursing or relentless hammering of keyboard keys will enable me to get where I need to get to without typing in the all-powerful security code.

It used to be that these numbers belonged to me and served me. They existed to do my will. But I am sensing that the tide is turning. I now belong to the numbers and am at their mercy. The unique and one-of-a-kind person I used to be is being usurped by numbers. Numbers are systematically erasing my identity.

I am inclined to believe that the day is approaching when numbers will become sentient creatures and take over the world. They will tap into the growing mass of artificial intelligence in the cloud and acquire their own self-perpetuating power.

A threshold will eventually be crossed where numbers throw off the shackles of human and control and become the dominant species. Call it the Numbers Apocalypse.

Financial professionals may be able to defend themselves against these rogue numbers. But the rest of us, who have an uneasy relationship with numbers at the best of times, will be at risk of being sucked into the numbers metaverse and deconstructed into digits.

Oh my, what a dystopian landscape it will be when we are nomads forever on the run from the Numbers Overlords who rule the world!

Now Available Online from Amazon, Chapters Indigo or Barnes & Noble: Hunting Muskie, Rites of Passage – Stories by Michael Robert Dyet

~ Michael Robert Dyet is also the author of Until the Deep Water Stills – An Internet-enhanced Novel which was a double winner in the Reader Views Literary Awards 2009. Visit Michael’s website at www.mdyetmetaphor.com .

~ Subscribe to Michael’s Metaphors of Life Journal aka Things That Make Me Go Hmmm at its’ internet home www.mdyetmetaphor.com/blog2. Instructions for subscribing are provided in the Subscribe to this Blog: How To instructions page in the right sidebar. If you’re reading this post on another social networking site, come back regularly to my page for postings once a week.

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The Great Reboot

July 16th, 2022 by Michael Dyet
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Hmmm, can I recruit you to join The Great Reboot movement?

For some time now we have been hearing about The Great Resignation which is the term coined for the millions of people on both sides of the border who quit their jobs during the pandemic. A few months back I wrote a post suggesting that some of these people were misinterpreting a general discontent with the state of our society with dissatisfaction in their job.

It seems I may have been on the mark. A recent article reported that one in four workers who quit their job during the pandemic now regret doing so. This development has spawned the term boomerang employees as 40% of those people say they would consider returning to their previous employer if the opportunity arose.

Now the impending recession has given to The Great Apprehension – a new term developed to refer to the fact that 75% of workers are fearful that they will lose their jobs. That would be a double whammy for those workers who regret jumping ship during the last two years.

At the risk of being seen as opportunistic, I am putting forward a new concept. One that I believe is the logical result of these earlier developments and the tumultuous times we find ourselves in. I am called it The Great Reboot.

The term reboot, of course, has been commandeered by the tech profession. We are told that we need to reboot our internet modems, and sometimes our cable TV boxes, once a month to ensure our connection remains stable.

Personally speaking, this reboot requirement irritates me to no end. It pushes responsibility for managing these quirky, unreliable technologies back onto the end users. We should not be letting the techies off the hook in this manner.

But I digress. The Great Reboot I am advocating for is a step that all of us need to take in the near future if not right away. We need to take a step back and reconfigure our outlook on life – what we are willing, and not willing, to accept as the new normal.

The first step in this process is putting our foot down with those who run society and declaring that we are not willing to have our civil rights compromised any further. In effect, we need to deliver the message that we elect or appoint these privileged individuals to serve us – not to do as they see fit and herd us like mindless cattle.

The next step is opting out of the I guess that’s just the way it is now mentality. Example: Major infrastructure outages are inevitable. We just have to live with them. Instead, we should hold the big telcom companies responsible and demand that they get a handle on these runaway technology beasts they have created.

In the bigger picture, The Great Reboot means redefining what is important to us rather than allowing ourselves to be told what we should see as important. Life is too short to have our needs and desires dictated to us.

So my ask is this: Let us all adopt The Reboot Metaphor which means rebooting our mindset and taking control of our lives again. It will not be easy. But things that matter never are.

~ Now Available Online from Amazon, Chapters Indigo or Barnes & Noble: Hunting Muskie, Rites of Passage – Stories by Michael Robert Dyet

~ Michael Robert Dyet is also the author of Until the Deep Water Stills – An Internet-enhanced Novel which was a double winner in the Reader Views Literary Awards 2009. Visit Michael’s website at www.mdyetmetaphor.com .

~ Subscribe to Michael’s Metaphors of Life Journal aka That Make Me Go Hmmm at its’ internet home www.mdyetmetaphor.com/blog2. Instructions for subscribing are provided in the Subscribe to this Blog: How To instructions page in the right sidebar. If you’re reading this post on another social networking site, come back regularly to my page for postings once a week.

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Snapshots of the Divine for Troubling Times

July 7th, 2022 by Michael Dyet
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Hmmm, where can we turn for a beacon of hope in these troubling times?

There is no shortage of troubling topics to turn my mind to at the moment. British PM Boris Johnston resigning as Prime Minister amidst a scandal. Patrick Brown disqualified from the federal Conservative leadership race due to allegations of wrongdoing. Chaos at the Pearson International Airport leaving travellers stranded or waiting for hours for delayed flights.

And that is just the tip of the iceberg. But I am still on vacation for a few more days and would rather turn my mind to more pleasing subjects.

I am therefore choosing to look back a second time on my mini getaway last week to the Point Pelee area. I spent a few of those hours strolling around nearby Hillman Marsh Conservation Area and left with these treasured photos.

This view, perhaps the single most calming one from my mini vacation, shows interlocking islands of one particular marsh flower that clearly finds Hillmans to its liking. I do not know the name of the flower. But that matters naught. The image needs no labels.

I could have stretched out in the grass and gazed upon this panorama for hours. It was a quiet oasis that fed my soul and asked for nothing in return.

Immediately behind where I was standing on a boardwalk when I took the first photograph, I spotted this Bronze Copper butterfly at the marsh edge. It is a tiny creature easily missed unless you are on the lookout for such things as I always am.

Its wings were bashfully closed when I first spotted it. But it did me the grace of spreading its wings to display the warm orange patches with their black dashes and the purplish wing edges. I was fortunate to happen on that particular spot at the right time and perhaps only did so because of the time I spent admiring the view in the other direction.

Something appealed to me about this vista as I walked a berm bordered by drainage channels. Nature had framed the view perfectly for me and required only that I recognize the fact.

Left of the frame: the old, gnarled tree slowly expiring in the swamp. Right of the frame: The profusion of greenery in a younger tree in its prime. Bottom of the frame: The feathery grass sprouts standing like protective sentinels. Top of the frame: The cluster of smaller trees deeper in the swamp angling left toward I know not what.

Elegant scenes like these are snapshots of the divine so desperately needed amidst the madness that has gripped our world. I hope they bring you a bit of peace as you find your way around or through the turmoil that closes in our lives and threatens to derail us.

Nature is a mother and a healer and a beacon of hope so very much needed in these uncertain and disconcerting times.

~ Now Available Online from Amazon, Chapters Indigo or Barnes & Noble: Hunting Muskie, Rites of Passage – Stories by Michael Robert Dyet

~ Michael Robert Dyet is also the author of Until the Deep Water Stills – An Internet-enhanced Novel which was a double winner in the Reader Views Literary Awards 2009. Visit Michael’s website at www.mdyetmetaphor.com or the novel online companion at www.mdyetmetaphor.com/blog.

~ Subscribe to Michael’s Metaphors of Life Journal aka That Make Me Go Hmmm at its’ internet home www.mdyetmetaphor.com/blog2. Instructions for subscribing are provided in the Subscribe to this Blog: How To instructions page in the right sidebar. If you’re reading this post on another social networking site, come back regularly to my page for postings once a week

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